Thursday, March 12, 2015

Kickstarter Day 24 (5 to go): a comfort read and a farewell to a giant of the field

Man, this year's been a rough one for SFF fandom.  First the world loses Nimoy, then Sir Terry Pratchett? Please, no more. I know so many people whose lives were touched by the Discworld books, all the way back to my best friends in high school, who would quote Pratchett's characters at each other in battles to see who would break down and start snickering first.  The only comfort is to know his legacy will live on, as new generations of readers discover his books.  I certainly intend to share Pratchett's wit and wisdom with my son when he's ready for Discworld.

In other, much happier news, The Labyrinth of Flame is so, SO close to having interior art!  Only 5 days left, but only a few more backers and we'll make it.    I used a pic of Longs Peak on my Kickstarter update today, but in Everest terms, we're totally at the South Summit, facing the final obstacle of the Hillary Step.  Just have to make that final push, so please, keep spreading the word!

For today's pic, I'm heading back to New Zealand's Routeburn Track, for a view near Harris Saddle:

Windswept tundra and a jewel of a lake
And for today's book rec, I'm going for another comfort read: Nina Kiriki Hoffman's The Silent Strength of Stones.  Often in fantasy a young protagonist is portrayed as escaping from their family situation; to find their own path they have to sever old ties.  But Hoffman takes a different approach.  In The Silent Strength of Stones, her characters learn to assert their individuality while also repairing strained bonds and gaining deeper insight into the families they thought were so uncaring.  The result is a tale that's full of quiet hope, complete with a resolution I find deeply satisfying.  Some books just feel good to read, and this is one of them.



       

4 comments:

  1. I've really enjoyed your book recs and your photos. I love about half the books you've mentioned, and plan to read the other half. I'm not strong enough to get to most of the places you've shown pictures of, but I have similar photos of more accessible places. I do so love getting up into the high country.

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    1. Thanks so much, Adrianne! I'm really glad you've been enjoying the pics and book recs (and more delighted yet to hear you'll be giving the ones you haven't read a try! So many of these books deserve more readers.)

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  2. THAT'S the view when nearing the ascent of Everest? Yikes. That's the point where I'd be like, "Okay, guys, this is good for me. I'll just take pictures of you going up. Soon as I tie myself to this boulder..."

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    1. Hahaha. Well, my blood circulation is so poor I'd have lost all my extremities long before I could get to the South Summit, so you'd be ahead of me. :)

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